Leonardo Da Vinci: Part 1

Leonardo Da Vinci was a famous painter and renaissance man, creating the fabulous work of art known as the Mona Lisa, one of the most famous paintings and best paintings in the world. Leonardo was also an amazing sculptor, scientist and inventor, who invented many inventions that were way ahead of his time. He is commonly known as a wonder, who changed the world with his pieces of art. But he wasn’t respected by everyone.

Leonardo Da Vinci was born out of a wedlock on the 14/15th of April 1452, in the city of Vinci. His parents were not married. His father was Messer Piero Fruosino Di Antonio Da Vinci, and his mother was a peasant named Catherina. His father soon later married a nice woman named Albiera Amadori who was nice enough but died at 16. Leonardo had no surname because his parents were not married, and he was known as Leonardo Da Vinci, simply meaning Leonardo from Vinci, in Italian.

During his childhood days, Leonardo received an informal education in Latin, geometry and mathematics. His interest became historical conjecture, a subject that included politics. When Leonardo was fourteen years old, he moved to Florence. When Leonardo was sixteen, his father married again to a woman who was twenty years old named Francesca Lanfredini who died young as well. Piero eventually remarried two more girls, who each gave birth to six children. Leonardo now had twelve half-siblings, all of whom were more than fifteen years younger than he was. The greatest thing that his father had ever done to him was send him to the studio of Verrocchio as a garzone, which meant “studio boy” in italian.

Leonardo eventually got the title of apprentice when he was seventeen and remained in training at the studio for seven more years. During his time at the studio, Leonardo was exposed to many fabulous people and subjects that made his mind very interested in the world. As Leonardo rose up the ranks in the studio, he became allowed to work on pieces of paintings. One painting that he collaborated on was called the baptism of christ, and he did so well on the angel he was assigned to paint that it made the rest of the painting look stiff. Verroccio saw so much talent in Leonardo that he put down his brush and never painted anything ever again. Verroccio spent the rest of his life sculpting and doing other arts.

In 1472, Leonardo’s father offered to make his own small studio, but Leonardo was so attached to Verroccio’s studio that he decided to stay there instead. Leonardo’s earliest known work created entirely by himself was made in Verroccio’s studio, it was a pen and ink drawing of the arno valley. In 1478, Leonardo received a commision for him to paint an altarpiece for the chapel of St. Bernard in the town of Pallazo Veccio. While working on this piece of art, he became officially independent from Verroccio’s studio. In 1480, Leonardo started working Piazza San Marco in Florence, an academy of artists, poets and philosophers organized by the Medici family.

Soon later he went to offer his services to the duke of Milan, named Lucovido Sforza. Leonardo went to Milan and gifted the duke with an instrument crafted from a horse’s skull and a rams horns. This present impressed the duke and Leonardo spent 17 years working for him, from 1482 to 1499. During this time Leonardo increased his skill by a lot and did many jobs for the duke, including engineering projects, statues and much more. Leonardo worked for the duke until he was overthrown during the second italian war. After the capture of the duke, Leonardo fled Milan and went to Venice. Leonardo did some work in Venice before he worked for Cesari Borgia.

Leonardo Da Vinci: Part 2 . . . Coming Soon!

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